CO2 Reduction

At the National Geographic Society, we believe in the power of science, exploration, education—and storytelling—to change the world. Our Sciencetelling Bootcamp helps National Geographic grant recipients learn how to communicate their important scientific discoveries in ways that build global geographic knowledge and empower us all to generate solutions for a healthier future.

An amazing new concept uses a wind turbine to condense water from the air and pump it into storage tanks for filtration and purification. The idea is revolutionary because it doesn’t require any power from the grid, as it is self-powered.

Los Angeles skies are becoming less smoggy, a clear sign that emission control strategies are working.

We’ve already protected 15% of the Earth’s land and 7% of our oceans. But it’s not enough to achieve a planet in balance. The National Geographic Society is teaming up with the Wyss Campaign for Nature to address our current conservation crisis. Our goal: Protect 30% of the planet in its natural state by 2030

Wild places on Earth are under threat like never before from unprecedented human destruction and degradation. The fight to protect these last wild places and secure the future of life on our planet is unfolding now.

For the first time, renewable sources have outdone nuclear power in the United States. Renewable energy sources, wind, water, solar and others passed nuclear generation as a share of U.S. power in September.

This eye-opening animation shows the dynamics of the ozone layer from January 1st to March 23rd in both 2010 and 2011. Recent observations from satellites and ground stations suggest that atmospheric ozone levels for March 2011 in the Arctic were approaching the lowest levels in the modern instrumental era.

Travelling by plane has never been more popular, with four billion passengers flying every year. But aviation emissions contribute to climate change, and scientists say we need to do more to tackle the problem. BBC research has found that only a tiny fraction of passengers travelling with the world’s biggest airlines are choosing to offset their carbon footprints. Carbon offset schemes involve paying extra in order to contribute to environmental projects that reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, though some say it’s just an excuse to continue polluting.

Governments worldwide have committed to a target of reducing Carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. European countries are aiming to go further and achieve net zero emissions by 2050. But the actions governments are collectively taking don’t look like they will be enough to meet their own targets.

Not all carbon is created equal. Writer Jackson Carpenter argues that the power to stop climate change rests on recognizing different kinds of carbon – a shift in perspective that allows us to change the world without changing our lifestyles. Jackson Carpenter has ten years’ experience working on solutions to climate change and the development of alternative fuels.

The average carbon footprint of a person in the US is 16.5 tons –TONS. So, what can you actually do decrease this number and make a meaningful difference?

A future of rising global temperatures looks bleak. To stop it, we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 2.5% every year, until they reach zero. Here’s how we can do it.

Reducing your carbon footprint just got easier. This video uses animations and humour to teach people how they can personally help prevent global warming. This video was created by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), a collaboration of British Columbia’s four research intensive universities.

World leaders call for action to avert ‘apocalyptic’ climate change … is the most significant climate meeting since the Paris summit was signed in 2015. … fuels, stop building new power stations and move toward net zero emissions. …

What is the true impact of global warming on human health? HMS and its affiliated hospitals recently signed a joint commitment to extensively decarbonize throughout our local medical community and actively contribute to reversing some of the ill effects of climate change. Aaron Bernstein will discuss how reducing greenhouse gas emissions provides health benefits, improves patient care and is quickly becoming critical to the future of health care.

We think we need to lead a perfectly green life to stand up against climate change. No! says Carla Reemtsma, 21-year-old climate activist. In her energetic and empowering talk, she defines the lines of responsibility for action – and for change. And she shares a number of practical ideas what we can all do. Carla is a 21 year old student in Politics and Economics student in Münster. When she is not active for climate change, she is in the gymnasium either training the school children or doing gymnastics herself.

What if we took out more greenhouse gases than we put into the atmosphere? This hypothetical scenario, known as “drawdown,” is our only hope of averting climate disaster, says strategist Chad Frischmann. In a forward-thinking talk, he shares solutions to climate change that exist today — conventional tactics like the use of renewable energy and better land management as well as some lesser-known approaches, like changes to food production, better family planning and the education of girls. Learn more about how we can reverse global warming and create a world where regeneration, not destruction, is the rule.

Individual action on climate change can include personal choices in many areas, such as diet, means of long- and short-distance travel, household energy use, consumption of goods and services, and family size. Individuals can also engage in local and political advocacy around issues of climate change.

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